pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

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Sleep In Teenagers

Right from birth it seems that tired children can crash to sleep anywhere, anytime they are tired. That’s all over in “teenhood” however, partly because all of the nervous system changes occurring with puberty.
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Ways Teens Can Ditch Obesity

Anyone with their eyes even half-way open can see that the worlds populace is buying larger-sized clothes this decade than in the last.

And the airwaves and bookshelves are filled with scammers desperately trying to pay for their new sports cars Read more→

How Much Sleep Should Children Be Getting?

Worrying is part of a parents job description and sleep is an issue worried about at both ends of the spectrum – infant, child and teen.

From sleeping through the night, to not wanting to go to sleep, to sleeping all day – just how much sleep should children be getting anyway?
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2015 Advances In Pediatric Medicine – Part 2

We’ve been taking a look back at the progress in medical research for pediatrics which occurred last year (2015). So far we’ve mentioned: Peanut allergies, new autism genes, strep throat guidelines and the FDAs removal of ear drops. Read more→

2015 Oh What A Year For Advances In Pediatric Medicine!

Ready or not, here we go again with another year in pediatric medicine. Statistics all start over; so, for things like “rates” (you know: death rates, immunization rates and injury rates) it’s like calling “kings X” and getting to start from scratch.
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Bedtime Stories

We’ve had plenty of previous posts about reading to children and its benefits. We haven’t however specifically mentioned the benefits of this parenting practice at bedtime – until a few days ago.
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Five Things You Should Know About Concussion and Contact Sports

Concussion and Contact Sports
Five important things to know

Did you pick out the Five Things About Concussions You Should Know?

First – don’t wait to “see if it goes away” before you seek accurate diagnosis. Often an accurate diagnosis depends on comparing measurements in an early visit with those in a later visit.

Second – Follow-up care is important not only to prevent further harm but sometimes to make an accurate diagnosis, especially about the brain and nervous system which can be very subtle.

Third – We now realize that there are long term effects of concussions, possibly up to 6 years! There may even be life-long consequences that must be overcome.

Fourth – Even multiple impacts without a diagnosed concussion often lead to long term effects. And,

Fifth, Helmets are designed to prevent skull fractures and NOT concussions.

 

Sexual Attraction and Orientation 

Here is a link to a printout for teens about sexual attraction and orientation. A good read for parents as well. It’s important that each teen finds a “confidant.”

[ http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=KidsHealth&lic=1&ps=207&cat_id=20016&article_set=50685 ]

Teaching Teens About Healthy Relationships

As I’ve been clearing out my “to do” file of articles, we’ve had a series of posts about parenting teens through puberty and preparing for the skill-set and tasks of adulthood. Pediatricians are in a position to have many opportunities to talk to teens about life issues and I’m thinking that perhaps you’d like to see some “bullet points” of common issues we address.
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Am I Ready To Have Sex? 

“Am I ready to have sex?” That’s a question only a rare parent will ever be asked by their teen. But, they might read an article on it – like this one.

[ http://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/dating-sex/Pages/Deciding%20to%20Wait.aspx ]

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