pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

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Robert Koch: Modern Bacteriology

A man after my own heart, Dr. Robert Koch, one of the top 50 “influencers” of medicine of all time, loved to travel—except he had the where-with-all and time to actually do it.
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23 ½ Hours

So, how about it. Do we think we can limit all the sitting and sleeping and TV-watching we do to only 23½ hours a day? The good doc listed a lot of benefits for exercise; and notice that he didn’t give any specific requirements about it other than it’s supposed to be “30 minutes.” That means that you can pick the absolutely “fun-est” thing you can think of (as long as it’s active) and do it for 30 minutes.

We’ve got a huge epidemic of nearly every ailment related to weight and sedentary living going on with our children. Perhaps the most significant legacy you can give your children is a love (at least tolerance) for being active in their lives. NOW is the time to take seriously all the recommendations being given to limit children’s TV (screen) time.

Fever Of Unknown Origin – FUO

It’s called FUO or “Fever of Unknown Origin” and its definition is about as big a mystery as its name. Back during my medical school days FUO meant something different to the neonatologists in the newborn unit than it did to the pediatricians out on the hospital ward.
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Immunization Schedules: Updated

Admittedly, the accepted schedule for preventive immunizations is a challenge to keep up with. Well, it is for us “doc” types so it must be for you as well.

For your reference, I’m going to embed in this page the latest immunization recommendations. They are in an easy-to-read chart form, covering immunizations of both: Infants and Children—birth through 6; and Preteens and Teens—7 through 18.
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Stanley Dudrick: Total Parenteral Nutrition

They guy who, unbeknownst to me, directed much of the many late nights I was on call for three years, comes up as number 42 of the fifty most influential doctors in history which we are going through.

Stanley Dudrick M.D. painstakingly invented and improved total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to the point it actually could be used in medicine and not cause more problems than it solved.
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There Are Martians In LA and An App To Find Them

Nagin Cox
TED: What time is it on Mars?

Nagin Cox is a first-generation Martian. As a spacecraft engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, she works on the team that manages the United States’ rovers on Mars. But working a 9-to-5 on another planet — whose day is 40 minutes longer than Earth’s — has particular, often comical challenges.

She tells us that she has dreamed of working at NASA since she was 14 years old and this is her “dream job.” She also divulged that “sleep experts” have studied her and her colleagues because working on Mars time “is a blast, but not sustainable” because it is so hard on the body of an “earthling.”

State of Immunizations: 2017

Believe it or not the brand spankin’ new immunization schedule just released has actually LOWERED the number of immunizations recommended for teens!

I know, it’s hard for me to comprehend too; but, we’ll take it while it lasts.
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Victor McKusick: Medical Genetics

Continuing our historical description of the top 50 most influential doctors in history we come to #44, Victor McKusick known as the father of medical genetics. Can you even comprehend what it means to have been the “inventor” or “founder” of an entire field of medicine? I’m not sure I can.
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Body Parts: State of the Research

New Body Parts
TED: Oded Shoseyov reveals the state of the arts in bionics – artificial body parts

What do you get when you combine the strongest materials from the plant world with the most elastic ones from the insect kingdom? Super-performing materials that might transform … everything – including body parts. Nanobiotechnologist Oded Shoseyov showed us examples of amazing materials found throughout nature, in everything from cat fleas to sequoia trees, and shows the creative ways his team is harnessing them in everything from sports shoes to medical implants.

Shoseyov is a professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an expert in nanobiotechnology; he has authored or co-authored more than 160 scientific publications and is the inventor or co-inventor of 45 patents. He received the Kaye Innovation Award from the Hebrew University in 2010, and an honorable mention from the Israeli Prime Minister for his contributions in entrepreneurship and innovation in 2012. He has founded ten companies, several of which are focused on engineering new materials for use in human tissue, jet fuel and food packaging.

How new technology helps blind people explore the world

Cheiko Asakawa
TED: New Tech For the Blind

The quiet yet dynamic, unassuming but persuasive, fully-accomplished TED fellow has accomplished more in her life despite blindness than most sighted people do in their lifetime.
Generating braille texts from books, a braille reader, an audio reader, a braille text editor – all her accomplishments. She and her associates develop oftware and products which help the blind become more educated and independent.

With ease, she describes ‘next generation’ products for the smart phone making its speaker and gps give her detailed directions around a building and its video read bar codes and wrappers to describe articles. The camera even notices the approach of a person, analyzes him to be a friend and tells her that ‘he looks happy.’

Finally, she announces that all this technology has been made OPEN SOURCE so that the world could join in its continued development. The average person doesn’t usually have a clue how significant that decision is! Imagine a world with an alternate Steve Jobs who announced that the iPhone was just made Open Source so everyone in the world could eventually be able to use one freely!

Virginia Apgar: Blue Babies

I think I’ve said something like this before but today’s number 45 of the top 50 physicians making a lasting impact on the field of medicine is known by EVERY pediatrician in the world, and most other physicians too. But that’s the definition of “lasting impact” isn’t it.

In 1949 Dr. Virginia Apgar was the first female full professor at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and in 1953 went on to create what became known as the “Apgar score.”
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Sleeping With “Big Soda” and Conflict of Interest

I have to tell you I’m still pretty ticked-off finding out about this huge conflict of interest: Big Soda acting like Big Tobacco and the health-care industry falling for it! I’m not sure where I’ve been to not hear about this until now; but, thankfully, the American Academy of Pediatrics and a few others have already come clean and done the right thing!
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