pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

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Vaccine Hero’s

Bill and Melinda Gates, perhaps today's most philanthropic people

Ever since Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft and chairman of the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, gave a talk about “Vaccine Hero’s” I’ve seen more and more “vested interests” jumping on his bandwagon with their own hero lists.

Gates had a list of seven person’s, 6 medical related and 1 business, who he is continually grateful for as he and his wife attempt to ameliorate great inequities and suffering around the world in the area of vaccines and disease prevention.
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#37 James Parkinson (1755-1824)

Dr. James Parkinson was born on World Parkinson’s Disease Day, April 11th 1755, in London, England. Of course he didn’t know it at the time. Come to think of it, neither did his parents; nor the fact that he would become one of the 50 most influential doctors of all time.

Affecting an estimated 1% of people over 60 years of age, what has come to be known as “Parkinson’s Disease” is one of the most common neurologic disorders known today.
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Helmets Don’t Prevent Concussion – Here’s Why

Concussion vs Skull Fractures
TED: David Camarillo explains difference

A ton of great information, right? I enjoyed the talk, even if he seemed a bit didactic and condescending in his delivery. None-the-less, the information that he DID give us is eye-opening and should cause us to pause in our analysis of how we’re going about protecting our kids. Completely being naïve to what we are doing doesn’t do anybody any good and may delay or prevent us from doing what really will protect them.

I completely understand the difference between concussion and skull fracture. And I understand completely why everyone’s first attempts at keeping kids safe was to protect against skull fracture. Obviously everyone makes the assumption, as I do, that decreasing skull fracture is a laudable goal because it intuitively must be related to concussion. But it’s interesting to realize that helmets are only designed and developed against fracture. However, we haven’t needed Camarillo to tell us that our former beliefs weren’t completely accurate. Most of us have come to believe that for several years; but, I’m glad that he and his group are trying to put some real dimension to the study and for that he should take credit.

If I find a disappointment with his talk it would be his appearing to want to take the credit for the discoveries of others in the field; and, his carefully worded dancing around the question regarding what we do now? Did you notice that he posed the question himself, then gave a non-answer… several times. He asked “what do I recommend to parents?” then skated to something like: “I don’t need to answer for me because I’ve got a couple years before my daughter actually rides a bike.”

So really, what DO we DO?! The honest answer is that there is nothing we can do, EXCEPT to do what we can—BUT not delude ourselves that what we are doing actually protects us from concussions. We’ve got helmets that don’t protect against concussion only fracture. We use what we can and look for other things we can do. We all have to decide for our own kids whether or not to let them participate in any activity, situation by situation. At the same time, to actually protect our kids we need to DEMAND MORE of our equipment, rule-makers, sports-organizers, government regulators, coaches, other teams, referees and umpires—pretty much everyone who is trying to turn children’s PLAY into trophy’s, pro-level goals and techniques and, yes, money-making schemes.

Those situations are not easily decided because of the complexity we have turned today’s “children’s play” into. It’s NOT just your coach; but how qualified, tolerant the referees are. Do they simply use common sense beneficial to children or are they just “winging it” or some sports wannabe living vicariously. And the other coach. Is he a complete nut who belittles his kids to basically “win at all costs?” And the schedule, does it suck every bit of spare time for other (let’s face it more life-important or family) activities out of not only your kid but the family as well? And the equipment—and on and on. Every decision stands on its own. Just know that today, there is probably 800 times more regimented activity available than is needed by your child to grow, develop and be happy in his life. You don’t NEED to endorse any sport for them to grow to their best potential.

Robert Koch: Modern Bacteriology

A man after my own heart, Dr. Robert Koch, one of the top 50 “influencers” of medicine of all time, loved to travel—except he had the where-with-all and time to actually do it.
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23 ½ Hours

So, how about it. Do we think we can limit all the sitting and sleeping and TV-watching we do to only 23½ hours a day? The good doc listed a lot of benefits for exercise; and notice that he didn’t give any specific requirements about it other than it’s supposed to be “30 minutes.” That means that you can pick the absolutely “fun-est” thing you can think of (as long as it’s active) and do it for 30 minutes.

We’ve got a huge epidemic of nearly every ailment related to weight and sedentary living going on with our children. Perhaps the most significant legacy you can give your children is a love (at least tolerance) for being active in their lives. NOW is the time to take seriously all the recommendations being given to limit children’s TV (screen) time.

Fever Of Unknown Origin – FUO

It’s called FUO or “Fever of Unknown Origin” and its definition is about as big a mystery as its name. Back during my medical school days FUO meant something different to the neonatologists in the newborn unit than it did to the pediatricians out on the hospital ward.
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Immunization Schedules: Updated

Admittedly, the accepted schedule for preventive immunizations is a challenge to keep up with. Well, it is for us “doc” types so it must be for you as well.

For your reference, I’m going to embed in this page the latest immunization recommendations. They are in an easy-to-read chart form, covering immunizations of both: Infants and Children—birth through 6; and Preteens and Teens—7 through 18.
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Stanley Dudrick: Total Parenteral Nutrition

They guy who, unbeknownst to me, directed much of the many late nights I was on call for three years, comes up as number 42 of the fifty most influential doctors in history which we are going through.

Stanley Dudrick M.D. painstakingly invented and improved total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to the point it actually could be used in medicine and not cause more problems than it solved.
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There Are Martians In LA and An App To Find Them

Nagin Cox
TED: What time is it on Mars?

Nagin Cox is a first-generation Martian. As a spacecraft engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, she works on the team that manages the United States’ rovers on Mars. But working a 9-to-5 on another planet — whose day is 40 minutes longer than Earth’s — has particular, often comical challenges.

She tells us that she has dreamed of working at NASA since she was 14 years old and this is her “dream job.” She also divulged that “sleep experts” have studied her and her colleagues because working on Mars time “is a blast, but not sustainable” because it is so hard on the body of an “earthling.”

State of Immunizations: 2017

Believe it or not the brand spankin’ new immunization schedule just released has actually LOWERED the number of immunizations recommended for teens!

I know, it’s hard for me to comprehend too; but, we’ll take it while it lasts.
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Victor McKusick: Medical Genetics

Continuing our historical description of the top 50 most influential doctors in history we come to #44, Victor McKusick known as the father of medical genetics. Can you even comprehend what it means to have been the “inventor” or “founder” of an entire field of medicine? I’m not sure I can.
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Body Parts: State of the Research

New Body Parts
TED: Oded Shoseyov reveals the state of the arts in bionics – artificial body parts

What do you get when you combine the strongest materials from the plant world with the most elastic ones from the insect kingdom? Super-performing materials that might transform … everything – including body parts. Nanobiotechnologist Oded Shoseyov showed us examples of amazing materials found throughout nature, in everything from cat fleas to sequoia trees, and shows the creative ways his team is harnessing them in everything from sports shoes to medical implants.

Shoseyov is a professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an expert in nanobiotechnology; he has authored or co-authored more than 160 scientific publications and is the inventor or co-inventor of 45 patents. He received the Kaye Innovation Award from the Hebrew University in 2010, and an honorable mention from the Israeli Prime Minister for his contributions in entrepreneurship and innovation in 2012. He has founded ten companies, several of which are focused on engineering new materials for use in human tissue, jet fuel and food packaging.

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