pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

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Yoga For Children and Stress Reduction

One of several “most interesting” aspects of medical school for my graduating class was had in the psychiatry department when they taught us the science behind and techniques for hypnosis; or, as I’ve heard others refer to it: selective relaxation or meditation. This article is not about yoga per-se but about its usefulness in aiding meditation or relaxation.

I’ve been asked about and used clinical hypnosis (markedly different than “stage hypnosis”) on a few selective patients with uniformly favorable results; I’ve taught a whole lot more patients the techniques of selective relaxation.
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Meditation For Kids and Time-Outs

I had a friend post an article on his blog about how to cope with tinnitus. He’s not a medical person but has intimate knowledge of the problem from the standpoint of what actually works and he discussed how meditation helps him.

I communicated with him a little about it and told him that I’d been working on a post about meditation for this blog for about two years. Actually, it’s been sitting in the “possibles” pen for that long, awaiting for a bump into production.
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5 Immunization-Preventable Diseases Coming Back

Of the thousands of diseases we’ve got to contend with there are only about 24 which are immunization-preventable. Perhaps it seems like more when you’ve got your kids to the doctor for well child care but it’s not.

The CDC and WHO keeps track of these things and that’s all we’ve got. They also keep track of how well we’re fighting them off and guess what—THEY’RE COMING BACK! We seem to be loosing the fight!
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Robert Koch: Modern Bacteriology

A man after my own heart, Dr. Robert Koch, one of the top 50 “influencers” of medicine of all time, loved to travel—except he had the where-with-all and time to actually do it.
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Stanley Dudrick: Total Parenteral Nutrition

They guy who, unbeknownst to me, directed much of the many late nights I was on call for three years, comes up as number 42 of the fifty most influential doctors in history which we are going through.

Stanley Dudrick M.D. painstakingly invented and improved total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to the point it actually could be used in medicine and not cause more problems than it solved.
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ADHD, Hyperactivity: Don’t JUST Take My Word For It 

Fussing around trying to find photos to accompany my many posts in the series about ADHD and hyperactivity, I stumbled upon a great article from one of the most “down home” type physicians on the internet, Greg Barrett MD. A professor at a prestigious college, this guy has won many awards from his medical students for just “plain talk” and “making sense”—along with the overall kindness usual with a Pediatrician. Here is a link to his article about ADHD entitled “Errors of commission and omission.”

Hyperactivity Treatment: What Really Works… Really

ADHD treatment - what we KNOW works

In this series so far we’ve learned that there are new guidelines for diagnosing ADHD and hyperactivity which should help standardize when a child is “labeled” with the problem. We’ve followed a child through an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and we’ve been reminded that the internet is full of scams which delay children from getting real help. Read more →

Stanley Prusiner: Neurodegenerative Diseases

We’re going through the top 50 doctors who have made a lasting impact on medicine throughout all time—at least according to a heavily read medical magazine which had its “best people” scratch their heads on the matter several months ago.
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Best Treatment For ADHD: Success In Something

All of us watching this video clip can’t help but believe that Jason will be one of those children who do well in spite of his ADHD—Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder. Not all do, largely because they lack the support systems that Jason has.

His grandmother is correct that the “condition” is something that he will have to some extent most of his life; but, its manifestation does change over time as his body and nervous system matures. For some reason, children with this condition seem to take longer to do so.

Additionally, he will learn other coping mechanisms including finding a life’s work that will fit with his temperament and skills. And things will get a lot easier for learning.

The true blessing in what we’ve watched for Jason, and any child with ADHD, is making it into maturity with confidence, hope AND a self-image which doesn’t do them harm.

Now that we’ve gotten to know him, I hope we get to see some follow-up in the coming years. We’re all rooting for you bud!

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