pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

Showing posts from: Series

William Harvey – Discovery of Circulation

We’ve only just begun, it seems, on our listing of the “50 most influential doctors in history,” a list made some time ago by a medical blog for physicians.

Today we chronicle the man who discerned the true nature of circulation, our number 46 on the list, William Harvey a contemporary of Galileo and Shakespeare and physician to King George of Great Britian.
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Zora Janžekovič – Pediatric Burn Pioneer

A while ago now, I decided to write a series of articles based on a magazine list described as the “top 50 influential doctors in history.”

The list, a big undertaking if not a bit ostentatious; the series of articles, a satisfying and most rewarding ride through the history of my profession – a ride even any parent would find an unexpected and critical benefit.
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Cardiac Arrest: Commotio Cordis – Prevention, Return To Play

Astin, the 17-year-old who suffered cardiac arrest when he was hit in the chest by an elbow playing baseball, is back for his 2nd follow-up. Remember, last visit he was depressed with worry over all the junk he had read on the internet and you (well I) assigned him some homework.

For the third article in the series we’ll talk about what we can do to “prevent” Commotio Cordis (CC, his final diagnosis) and help him decide about going back to play baseball in competition.
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Doctor Helen Brooke Taussig – World Renowned Cardiologist

Like others in this series of the 50 top physicians of all time, Helen Brooke Taussig is known by every Cardiologist in the world… most Pediatricians too.

You too would do well to get to know of her, if only to grasp a better understanding on how to care for your own children.
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Cardiac Arrest: Commotio Cordis – Treatment and Prevention

Ok, it’s been over a week and your 17-year-old Commotio Cordis patient who suffered a cardiac arrest on the baseball field is back for his follow-up and an answer to his question: “When can I go back to playing baseball?”

You knew he was coming and you’ve had a week to prepare what to tell him… so, go ahead, I’d like to hear this too…

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Cardiac Arrest in a Child Athlete

Most of you let your children participate in sports so it’s critical that you know this. Bear with me, it’ll be fun – and something you want to talk to the coach about.
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Sudden Cardiac Death in Child Athletes

Sudden Cardiac Death is, by definition, both sudden and unexpected – especially in a child whose life is supposed to revolve around “play” and “fun.” Unfortunately, it is also increasing.

Just as unfortunate, children’s “play” is often “industrialized” into major competitions with adult methods, standards and expectations leading to unintended consequences.
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Concussion Management and Return to Learn

Pediatric Concussion Management
Getting Back in the “Game”

This video is another one of Dr. Mike Evans productions where he explains in clear language what a concussion is and how it is treated. More specifically how a child should help themselves heal so they can have the best chance of returning to full activity levels – always the goal.

It is an updated version of his previous video (still available) which includes all the new information we’ve learned about the topic over the last several years of player observation and research – and that’s a lot!

You’ll also note that this post adds to the growing collection of articles I’ve written in this series about concussion in children and teens; which not only reflects the fact that concussion makes up a huge percentage of cases of morbidity and death in the US, but that it’s also largely preventable and therefore unnecessary – as well as one of the hottest topics in medical research these days. Give all of them a look-see, the links are in the box below.

[The web site www.allkids.org/ has more information or, better yet, you can contact your own school’s administration for information about your local return to learning policies.]

Return to Learning after Concussion

Return to Learning
Following a Concussion

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury (TBI) which doesn’t show up on an MRI or CT scan. Therefore, even though there is no apparent structural damage there often is significant damage to the brains ability to do its work (functional/process damage).

The student athlete shown in the video was surprised about how substantially his memory and other skills were shown to have diminished following his concussion. As it turns out the treatment of his “physical injuries” were actually less significant than what needed to be done to completely “make him better.”

Both physical and cognitive rest is essential to allow the brain to heal. While return to play protocols are mandated by the Florida High School Athletic Association (and other entities), return-to-learning policies are established by local school districts and even vary between different areas of the same state – or schools within the same district (if they have them at all).

This video highlights the effects of TBI-concussion and the importance of returning to learning in a structured manner. The web site www.allkids.org/ has more information or, better yet, you can contact your own school’s administration for information about your local return to learning policies.

 

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