pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

Return to Learning after Concussion

This is a video that you shouldn’t miss seeing! It’s a very well done video from a Florida school system designed to help take the “silliness” out of school children’s desire to keep playing in spite of facts stating otherwise. It explains the current state of our understanding about Traumatic Brain Injury – Concussion and the logic behind how decisions should be made about athlete’s head injuries and return-to-play. And it begins by taking the teen athlete’s point of view.

Return to Learning
Following a Concussion

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury (TBI) which doesn’t show up on an MRI or CT scan. Therefore, even though there is no apparent structural damage there often is significant damage to the brains ability to do its work (functional/process damage).

The student athlete shown in the video was surprised about how substantially his memory and other skills were shown to have diminished following his concussion. As it turns out the treatment of his “physical injuries” were actually less significant than what needed to be done to completely “make him better.”

Both physical and cognitive rest is essential to allow the brain to heal. While return to play protocols are mandated by the Florida High School Athletic Association (and other entities), return-to-learning policies are established by local school districts and even vary between different areas of the same state – or schools within the same district (if they have them at all).

This video highlights the effects of TBI-concussion and the importance of returning to learning in a structured manner. The web site www.allkids.org/ has more information or, better yet, you can contact your own school’s administration for information about your local return to learning policies.

 

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