pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

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How To Tell When Your Child Is Lying

Kang Lee
Researcher in children’s lying

Are children poor liars? Do you think you can easily detect their lying? Developmental researcher Kang Lee studies what happens physiologically to children when they lie. They do it a lot, starting as young as two years old, and they’re actually really good at it. Lee explains why we should celebrate when kids start to lie and presents new lie-detection technology that could someday reveal our hidden emotions.

Mr. Lee has devoted his career to understanding the development of social cognition and behavior.

With an international team based at the University of Toronto, he investigates the neurological and social basis of emerging social behaviors in young children. His two­-pronged research focuses first on how and when children develop the capacity to lie, to detect lies and to feel guilty about it afterwards.

The second focus of Lee’s research is facial recognition, which has led to revelations of when children develop the ability to distinguish races ­­and has helped explain why some people occasionally see Jesus’ face on a piece of toast.

We found that regardless of gender, country, religion, at two years of age, 30 percent lie, 70 percent tell the truth about their transgression. At three years of age, 50 percent lie and 50 percent tell the truth. At four years of age, more than 80 percent lie. And after four years of age, most children lie. So as you can see, lying is really a typical part of development. And some children begin to tell lies as young as two years of age.

Brain On Legalized Marijuana, Cannabis, THC

Medicine is a profession which responds to human misery by discovery and the innovation of solutions. We’re “hampered” in some ways, of course, by ethical considerations for how we treat humans.

For example we don’t go around concussing peoples heads, removing their limbs with explosions or injecting poisons to see how they damage their developing brains. For that we must wait until people do that to themselves or others – like in war, football… and now open, legalized marijuana use!
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Josh Grobin and Friend

Josh Grobin
Talented Artist – Unusually Giving Performer

However, also doing just what he does, at the same time he’s enjoying performing he shows that he is confident enough in his own talent and position to have no hesitation whatsoever letting others share his limelight. It takes very little of his time, diminishes his own “stardom” not even a little and yet builds up someone else and gives an experience that will fill personal journals for a lifetime – “The day I sang with Josh Grobin.”

Showing a confidant and giving attitude, highly unique to performers of his generation, Josh has a segment in many of his performances where he talks personally with a fan (possibly screened in advance) and sings a few bars with them, of a song they select. On occasion, more often than you’d think, the “amateur” surprises everyone and gives a riveting performance.

To see that kind of kindness in a performer is inspiring — especially to one who notices all types of “parenting” wherever I see it.

Safe Sleep For Infants: SIDS & SUIDs

The slogan “Back to Sleep” which revolutionized infant sleep methods has been changed to “Safe To Sleep” to broaden its scope and bring other causes of sleep-related infant death “into the fold” for research. Perhaps you already knew that, the slogan has been registered as a trademark of the US Department of Health and Human Services.
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Summer Injury Alert – The Top 11

A summer injury is best to be avoided if we want to make the most of the sun, fun and time out of school. Fortunately, most all of the common ones are preventable if we are but forewarned and take a few precautions.
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Concussion Management and Return to Learn

Pediatric Concussion Management
Getting Back in the “Game”

This video is another one of Dr. Mike Evans productions where he explains in clear language what a concussion is and how it is treated. More specifically how a child should help themselves heal so they can have the best chance of returning to full activity levels – always the goal.

It is an updated version of his previous video (still available) which includes all the new information we’ve learned about the topic over the last several years of player observation and research – and that’s a lot!

You’ll also note that this post adds to the growing collection of articles I’ve written in this series about concussion in children and teens; which not only reflects the fact that concussion makes up a huge percentage of cases of morbidity and death in the US, but that it’s also largely preventable and therefore unnecessary – as well as one of the hottest topics in medical research these days. Give all of them a look-see, the links are in the box below.

[The web site www.allkids.org/ has more information or, better yet, you can contact your own school’s administration for information about your local return to learning policies.]

Puberty, Acne and Beyond – Most Internet Information Wrong

It’s called Acne Vulgaris, and for most children in the throws of the crisis called Puberty the name pretty much sums up how they feel about it. It is the most common skin disease of any and pretty much hits 80% of us at some time or another.

The issue is that our skin has “pilosebaceous units” all over it, made up of a hair Read more →

Mythbusters: Does This Cause Cancer?

Merely “living life” these days has become something like walking through a mine field just trying to exist and avoid all the known pitfalls to your basic health – UV, asbestos, benzene and on and on.

We just get rid of tobacco and the horses’ proctums weasel in E-Cigaretts through Read more →

Return to Learning after Concussion

Return to Learning
Following a Concussion

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury (TBI) which doesn’t show up on an MRI or CT scan. Therefore, even though there is no apparent structural damage there often is significant damage to the brains ability to do its work (functional/process damage).

The student athlete shown in the video was surprised about how substantially his memory and other skills were shown to have diminished following his concussion. As it turns out the treatment of his “physical injuries” were actually less significant than what needed to be done to completely “make him better.”

Both physical and cognitive rest is essential to allow the brain to heal. While return to play protocols are mandated by the Florida High School Athletic Association (and other entities), return-to-learning policies are established by local school districts and even vary between different areas of the same state – or schools within the same district (if they have them at all).

This video highlights the effects of TBI-concussion and the importance of returning to learning in a structured manner. The web site www.allkids.org/ has more information or, better yet, you can contact your own school’s administration for information about your local return to learning policies.

 

Concussions 101, a Primer for Kids and Parents

Concussion 101
a Primer For Kids and Parents

The “Concussions 101” title is used by Dr. Mike Evans for his short video because it covers the basic information that kids and their parents need to understand when they’ve had a concussion – sort of like the “101” courses you take in college do.

Dr. Evans is a “family practitioner” – [we pediatricians don’t hold that against him] – who has a way with little video segments and has “hit the nail on the head”[oops, poor analogy, sorry] – with this short summary.

Oh, this is not the complicated medical stuff that we doctors worry about; it’s merely three of the things which are sometimes considered so “simple” that nobody thinks to talk to you about them!

  1. We don’t wanna make things worse – we follow “return to activity” protocols to prevent life-long secondary damage.
  2. We can’t predict from the beginning what will happen or how you will do – “we have to prepare for the worst and hope for the best.”
  3. Communication – people presume you’re ok because they can’t see your brain; so, you need to be clear and honest about how you’re feeling.

Your brain is You. Everything you’ve gotten good at is stored in there; all your memories, all your skills for figuring things out for school or life are built into your brain.

Take care of your awesome brain after your concussion!

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