pediatric housecalls Robert R. Jarrett M.D. M.B.A. FAAP

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Victor McKusick: Medical Genetics

Continuing our historical description of the top 50 most influential doctors in history we come to #44, Victor McKusick known as the father of medical genetics. Can you even comprehend what it means to have been the “inventor” or “founder” of an entire field of medicine? I’m not sure I can.
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Body Parts: State of the Research

New Body Parts
TED: Oded Shoseyov reveals the state of the arts in bionics – artificial body parts

What do you get when you combine the strongest materials from the plant world with the most elastic ones from the insect kingdom? Super-performing materials that might transform … everything – including body parts. Nanobiotechnologist Oded Shoseyov showed us examples of amazing materials found throughout nature, in everything from cat fleas to sequoia trees, and shows the creative ways his team is harnessing them in everything from sports shoes to medical implants.

Shoseyov is a professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an expert in nanobiotechnology; he has authored or co-authored more than 160 scientific publications and is the inventor or co-inventor of 45 patents. He received the Kaye Innovation Award from the Hebrew University in 2010, and an honorable mention from the Israeli Prime Minister for his contributions in entrepreneurship and innovation in 2012. He has founded ten companies, several of which are focused on engineering new materials for use in human tissue, jet fuel and food packaging.

How new technology helps blind people explore the world

Cheiko Asakawa
TED: New Tech For the Blind

The quiet yet dynamic, unassuming but persuasive, fully-accomplished TED fellow has accomplished more in her life despite blindness than most sighted people do in their lifetime.
Generating braille texts from books, a braille reader, an audio reader, a braille text editor – all her accomplishments. She and her associates develop oftware and products which help the blind become more educated and independent.

With ease, she describes ‘next generation’ products for the smart phone making its speaker and gps give her detailed directions around a building and its video read bar codes and wrappers to describe articles. The camera even notices the approach of a person, analyzes him to be a friend and tells her that ‘he looks happy.’

Finally, she announces that all this technology has been made OPEN SOURCE so that the world could join in its continued development. The average person doesn’t usually have a clue how significant that decision is! Imagine a world with an alternate Steve Jobs who announced that the iPhone was just made Open Source so everyone in the world could eventually be able to use one freely!

Virginia Apgar: Blue Babies

I think I’ve said something like this before but today’s number 45 of the top 50 physicians making a lasting impact on the field of medicine is known by EVERY pediatrician in the world, and most other physicians too. But that’s the definition of “lasting impact” isn’t it.

In 1949 Dr. Virginia Apgar was the first female full professor at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and in 1953 went on to create what became known as the “Apgar score.”
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Sleeping With “Big Soda” and Conflict of Interest

I have to tell you I’m still pretty ticked-off finding out about this huge conflict of interest: Big Soda acting like Big Tobacco and the health-care industry falling for it! I’m not sure where I’ve been to not hear about this until now; but, thankfully, the American Academy of Pediatrics and a few others have already come clean and done the right thing!
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Eat All You Take: Portion Distortion

Did you get all those “tricks” to give them a HAND over portion distortion?

– Food labels can’t be relied on
– Serve children on smaller plates, they’ll look larger.
– Dish out families food in kitchen on plates and bring them to the table, learn correct portion control.
– Don’t let children serve themselves out of “family-sized” bowls, they’ll always take too much.
– “Lend them a HAND,” teach them “rules of thumb” for portion control using their hand as an example. As it GROWS, so does the portion size.
– The FIST represents the portion size of rice, cereal, fruits or vegetables for a single meal.
– The size of the PALM represents the amount of protein, about 4 or 5 ounces, that should make up a DAILY serving size for a child or teen.
– The TOP OF THE THUMB’s FIRST JOINT represents the amount of mayonnaise, butter or salad dressing for a single meal.
– Eating at restaurant, wait to see what portion size comes for your child before ordering yourself so you can share theirs if it’s too large, or cut it in half and serve it as a second meal later on.
– Parents, you need to set a good example: if you don’t ask for seconds, your child won’t either.

Super, advice and tips.

Ways To Lower Risk Of Allergies

Even though you may show little gratitude for it on a routine basis, I know you think that your wonderful “developed” country universally has lower rates of every disease than those poor, unfortunate undeveloped areas with little health care. Am I right? And it largely has to do with better hygiene… right? Huh? Huh?
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William Harvey – Discovery of Circulation

We’ve only just begun, it seems, on our listing of the “50 most influential doctors in history,” a list made some time ago by a medical blog for physicians.

Today we chronicle the man who discerned the true nature of circulation, our number 46 on the list, William Harvey a contemporary of Galileo and Shakespeare and physician to King George of Great Britian.
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“Presidential” Medicine

Anyone who hasn’t just about had enough of all things “presidential” by now must have spent the last year living in a cave somewhere.

I’ve found some “presidential medicine” related stuff that you probably “ought to know.” Just sayin!
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Rheumatic Fever Video

Here is a video I found that contains information about Rheumatic Fever for “medical types.” A DISCLAIMER is that the commentary is being delivered by a HIRED VOICE-OVER ARTIST, according to the authors bio. I say that, because he apparently knows how to pronounce “synergy” but not “Sydenham” or that “arthralgia” is NOT “muscle pain” but rather “joint pain.”

He gives basically good information but sort of sounds like he’s parroting text material and unsure about specifics of the disease – I would highly doubt he’s a pediatrician. Yes, “Sydenham” IS the name of the discovering physician.

3 Rashes And Their Heart Problems

We’ve chatted about rashes before (ok, a lot) and we’ve talked about heart diseases before. Heart diseases only very rarely are associated with rashes. And only an infinitesimally small number of rashes cause heart disease. When they do, it’s worth talking about… so let’s chat about rashes and heart.
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Zora Janžekovič – Pediatric Burn Pioneer

A while ago now, I decided to write a series of articles based on a magazine list described as the “top 50 influential doctors in history.”

The list, a big undertaking if not a bit ostentatious; the series of articles, a satisfying and most rewarding ride through the history of my profession – a ride even any parent would find an unexpected and critical benefit.
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